Article Submission Guidelines for Practice Management, EHR, Glaucoma, and Managed Care

CLASSIFIEDS

Pre-owned equipment, practices for sale, open positions, helpful practice management resources and more!

Click here to view the latest classifieds from Optometric Management.

Article Date: 8/1/2013

Print Friendly Page
O.D. to O.D.
O.d. to O.d.

Innovation: Fall Behind at Your Own Risk

Technology isn’t going anywhere, but your patients will, if you don’t stay up to date on the latest offerings.

images

BY SCOT MORRIS, O.D., F.A.A.O.
Chief Optometric Editor

Many people see technology as the problem behind the so-called digital divide. Others see it as the solution. …Technology is neither. It must operate in conjunction with business, economic, political and social systems … — Carly Fiorina, business executive

Technology is not the enemy. We are. Technology doesn’t make us better or worse, it only magnifies what we do well and what we must improve. As Ms. Fiorina’s quote alludes, technology must co-exist and integrate with all things for it to be a successful piece of what we do in life and business.

Healthcare technology has an even more convoluted role. Such technology, whether diagnostic devices, therapeutic procedures or just the ability to share information across multiple platforms and throughout society, is at the core of healthcare and the pending healthcare reform movement.

Unquestionably, the American healthcare system is about to undergo a rapid and much-needed change. As the rules and compliance processes get more challenging, technology will become essential just to operate, much less thrive, in healthcare.

No technology, no patients

Our consumers also demand this technology. With the invention of many mobile technologies in the eyecare space, as well as online ordering, social community recommendations and generational changes, if we don’t keep up with our technology our consumers will leave.

With this in mind, ponder this three-part question: What one thing have you done in the last three months to improve your efficiency, upgrade your technology and increase your profitability? If you don’t have an answer for each, maybe it is time to take a step in the right direction and innovate and re-engineer your office. Sometimes, this is the best way to break out of the status quo. In every aspect of your office, constant, small changes can motivate, empower and re-charge your staff, your consumers and yourself.

How do you make the choice?

With all the new technologies available, how do we choose and, even more importantly, pay for new technology? OM’s main features cover the technology you may want to consider, the questions you need to ask before purchasing and how to identify your ROI. Also, Scott Jens, O.D., provides a “must-read” piece on how to differentiate your practice through technology.

We cover how to talk the tech talk, make smart decisions based on what equipment you have and what you need, how to save money with biometric time clocks, and even leverage someone else’s technology to build your practice. We finish off with a look inside Past President Dori Carlson’s practice changes, as she has implemented technology into her practice. OM



Optometric Management, Volume: 48 , Issue: August 2013, page(s): 2

Table of Contents Archives