Article

VIEWPOINT

THIS MAY TAKE A WHILE

BECOME THE SOURCE OF PATIENT EDUCATION ON CONTACT LENSES

IF ASKED, ”What’s new in contact lenses?” A reasonable answer might begin with, “Have a seat, this may take a while.” In addition to new lenses (in a variety of modalities, materials, designs and parameters), the answer could include legislative activity, rebate and finance programs and competition from several sources, just to cite a few of many topics.

A common theme running through each of these topics is that optometrists are in a prime position to provide patient education. Patients have access to contact lens news 24/7 from any number of sources (and agendas). If you aren’t their primary source, then where are your patients getting their contact lens information?

FROM MYOPIA CONTROL TO DRUG DELIVERY

In this month’s issue of OM, dedicated to contact lenses, we lead with myopia control (p.18), one of the hot topics in optometry. In this feature, Jeffrey Walline, O.D., Ph.D., discusses three options for treatment: soft multifocal contact lenses, orthokeratology and atropine. Jennifer Harthan, O.D., F.A.A.O., F.S.L.S., continues the ortho-k discussion in her feature (p.26) that covers tips for patient selection, fitting and success. “Vault Into Scleral Lens Fits” (p.22), by Gregory W. DeNaeyer, O.D., F.A.A.O., rounds out the feature section with an explanation of the technology that can improve the fitting process.

Shifting to a broader focus, Chief Optometric Editor Scot Morris, O.D., F.A.A.O., explains that contact lens intolerance is a “dual disease,” one that threatens both patients and the practice (p.2). and on p.40, Jeffry D. Gerson, O.D., F.A.A.O., discusses how to broach contact lens wear with patients and the lens types to keep top of mind.

Jason Miller, O.D., F.A.A.O., fields the question: If price is an issue, then why do practitioners forecast fitting more daily disposable lenses in 2017? In “Contact Lens” (p.34), he explains that it is about value — that is, patients will pay more for convenience. In “Glaucoma” (p.41), Justin Schweitzer, O.D., F.A.A.O., looks to the future, where contact lenses may act as drug-delivery systems to control IOP.

Of course, we’ve also included our regular lineup of patient care and practice management content. You can view a snapshot of it all on p.80, our “Tips” page. OM