Article Date: 5/1/2010

Optos Offers Clinical and Practical Value

Optos Offers Clinical and Practical Value

Dr. Gerson: How do you think the optomap enhances our practices from a management standpoint? Also, how does it affect the patient experience?

Dr. Rothschild: It does a tremendous job of allowing me to standardize the eye exam. I screen every patient with the optomap, which gives me a good widefield picture of the retina. Based on that, I start making decisions in the exam room about which direction the exam is going to go. I can decide whether I am going to dilate the patient this time and base all of those types of questions on the optomap Retinal Exam as my solid starting point with each patient. The pre-testing is the same every time.

Having the technology also gives my staff an opportunity to explain to patients how our office sets itself apart from other offices based on the advanced technology we use. We have made these investments in equipment to help us take the best possible care of our patients. Those aspects, to me, make the optomap a valuable practice management tool.

Dr. Warstadt: Patients love technology, and they love to see that the practice is on the cutting edge. The optomap has a substantial educational aspect to it as well.

Dr. Nelson: When I brought the Optos technology to the practice, I became aware quickly of how in the past, patients had no idea what I was talking about when I told them I was dilating their eyes to look for retinal holes, detachments, tumors, high blood pressure, diabetes and so on. The optomap made the light bulb come on for patients. It gave them an understanding of why we dilate them and showed them that optometrists can detect problems, such as high blood pressure or diabetes, during an eye examination.

The optomap made the light bulb come on for patients. It gave them an understanding of why we dilate them and showed them that optometrists can detect problems, such as high blood pressure and diabetes, during an eye examination.

— David W. Nelson, OD

The optomap has changed the patient experience enormously. Not only does it change our clinical paradigm, but it changes what the exam is all about for patients.

Dr. Gerson: We can go beyond telling patients what we see by actually showing them. We can say we are looking for signs of this or that condition, but we can also illustrate for them the changes that are occurring.

Showing them the optomap clarifies the importance of what we are telling them. They get a better understanding of why they should come see us again in 6 months or see their primary care doctor, even though they feel absolutely fine.

Figure 6. The optomap 3D wrap image is a useful patient education tool.

Dr. Schaeffer: The optomap produces income for the practice and is probably the best public relations tool I have ever had. It elevates the practice to a very high level of care, which is the kind of care we are supposed to provide.

We can go beyond telling patients what we see by actually showing them … We know that asymptomatic can still be problematic, but that is not as clear to patients. Showing them the optomap clarifies the importance of what we are telling them.

— Jeffry Gerson, OD

Dr. Rothschild: The whole examination experience is different for patients because of the optomap.

Take, for example, how it compares with a fundus camera from the patient's perspective. The optomap images the ultrawidefield view in a split second. The fundus camera requires several photos, so patients are struggling with the bright flashes and turning their eye in all different directions. The camera creates much more of a hassle for them.

Dr. Gerson: As we have discussed, the optomap is responsible for a long list of benefits that are realized by both doctors and patients. It changes the way we provide eye care, allowing us to perform a higher level exam. It improves office flow. It helps educate patients and makes them more active participants in their care, not only in relation to their eyes but also their overall health. And, just for some icing on the cake, so to speak, it is a great public relations booster — complete with the "wow factor" that every practice needs. OM



Optometric Management, Issue: May 2010