Article Date: 1/1/2014

Hiring
PERSONNEL POINTERS
hiring

The Right Person for the Job

Hire people who best fit the position and fill your needs.

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REBECCA L. JOHNSON, COT, CPOT, COE

Jenny, a former front desk receptionist in my office, was at risk of losing her job. Even though she was very good at entering charges and appointments into the computer, she was chronically late for work and did not seem to take an interest in her job responsibilities.

However, to my surprise, when I posted an open technician position, Jenny applied. My natural instinct was to turn her down, but I was intrigued by her interest, so I decided to discuss the position with her. Jenny convinced me to take a chance on her as a technician and, within six months, was our most requested technician.

It is very possible to hire the “right person,” for the “wrong job.” Here, I explain how you can prevent this and ensure you have the ideal people on your staff.

1 Deviate from your personality/skills.

You cannot afford to solely employ people who share your views, personality and communication style. Imagine a football team in which every member is a gifted quarterback — who would block and catch the ball?

As a leader, recognize your weaknesses, and employ people who are strong in these areas.

For example, if you are an analytical person and have a difficult time expressing enthusiasm, be mindful of these traits when hiring a technician. Happy technicians can be beneficial as they make a huge impact on the amount of energy in the office.

For instance, I assigned Jenny to work with one of the quieter doctors in our clinic. Her sense of humor made her a nice addition and complemented the serious doctor’s demeanor.

2 Match personality/skill to the specific job.

Before interviewing candidates, make a list of required personality traits and skills for the position.

For instance, if you are looking to hire a front-desk receptionist, remember that this person should be punctual, organized, an adroit multitasker and friendly. If you’re looking to fill an optician opening, realize this person should be outgoing, competitive and have an interest in fashion.

To help determine whether potential employees are best suited for an available position, ask them the following questions, which will help you gain insight into their personality:

What motivates you?

In what area do you feel you have a natural talent?

Why do you want to work here?

What do you bring to work every day that would be missed if you were not here?

When I asked Jenny why she wanted the job, she shared that she was bored at the front desk. She dreamed of being a nurse but was not in a position to go to nursing school and felt the technician job came close to nursing.

That is exactly where I was when I first started my career in ophthalmology. When given a technician job, I began to see eye care as a career, not just a job. This was the moment Jenny convinced me to let her prove herself as a technician.

Finding the sweet spot

Putting the right person in the right job creates connection and purpose. This breeds passion, as people naturally work best in their sweet spot. Just ask Jenny. OM

MS. JOHNSON IS THE FOUNDER AND PRESIDENT OF EYETRAIN4YOU, AN OPHTHALMIC STAFF COACHING AND DEVELOPMENT COMPANY. E-MAIL HER AT REBECCA@EYETRAIN4YOU.COM, OR SEND COMMENTS TO OPTOMETRICMANAGEMENT@GMAIL.COM.



Optometric Management, Volume: 49 , Issue: January 2014, page(s): 44